Home Blog

Google mind control

0

Google has recently published a research paper about using facts to help rank sites this basically means the end of opinions which do not meet Google guidelines! Google says one of its aims is to eliminate “popular” gossip websites that often do not tell the whole truth or websites that are spreading false information such as celebrity gossip websites or information websites. However this seems like a lot of effort to censor just false information found on sites that have high page rank and people obviously like them regardless of the information on them (as you would think that Google’s current system of ranking sites based upon links would mean truthful and honest websites that internet users find helpful would get more links to usefulness rubbish…) which makes you think that Google actually intends to censor websites based upon more than just black and white facts!

As you may already know if people cannot find your website on a search engine you are basically non existent on the internet and because Google has a massive 80% market share if you got something to say and want people to actually find and read what you have to say you have to be on Google! However Google’s recent research article about ranking sites based upon facts by cross checking facts extracted from a website with facts that they know are to be true in their self created knowledge base could spell the end of all websites Google disagrees with and doesn’t want being seen by its users (its users being the vast majority of the internet). If Google deems that your site is not telling the truth Google will penalize your site.. it is as simple as that. With Google’s monopoly on internet search (the internet being the biggest source of information in the world) it would appear Google wishes to control what is true and what is not… a power that should not be granted to ANY COMPANY as the consequences would be the ability of mind control! The Google knowledge base gathers it facts from Google’s own research and input as well as from websites such as Wikipedia and other sites Google deems trustworthy it would not be that hard for Google to add political and religious agendas to the database allowing Google to easily censor websites that do not go by the cult rules of Google. This will cause the internet to become very stagnant and even wreck the choice of opinions available on the internet as everyone tries to strive at writing facts and opinions similar to that found on the knowledge base meaning goodbye freedom of speech and goodbye choice! This will happen as Google already penalizes sites that do not abide by its rules and Google has ruined so many peoples businesses and livelihoods. Many websites owners already desperately fear of upsetting Google and fear that there businesses will be gone if they intentionally or unintentionally do something that Google does not like so going along with promoting facts or opinions that Google likes and not writing about stuff that Google does not like is very likely indeed!

Google is evil.

Back

2

The last time I was here blogging on EditorUnleashed was quite a while ago now, in fact it has been over 4 years ago now. In those 4 years the domain dropped and spammers took over EditorUnleashed posting a whole load of spam ripped from Wikipedia and the spammers were spamming about “creative writing” services of all things.

I have manged to get my the domain back and I am eager to start posting however thanks to the spammers the domain has been marked as pure spam and has been deindxed by Google so that means that I will have to go through the whole process of filling a reconsideration request which could take sometime.. but needed if I am going to get search traffic!

Ps, I am currently setting up a new bbpress forum!

Update: I received a message back from Google… apparently my website is still violating Google “guidelines” and the reconsideration request has been declined. I don’t think the manual reviewers at Google actually read (or can read) the websites that they are meant to review and just press the decline button like robots with no thought for the individuals actually behind the sites they are effectively throwing in the trash can. Well its the last time im using Google that’s for sure!

Q&A: Agent Donald Maass

0

This is a guestpost by the writer Eros-Alegra Clarke for the EditorUnleashed.

As a mother, I find that parenting analogies come easily to me when contemplating the process of writing. Regardless of whether a writer is a biological parent or not, I think most writers have a sense of ‘raising’ their stories. After all, most of our stories are conceived by a mysterious combination of personal experience and an outside source that grabs our attention, our passion, long enough to begin the creation of a life on the page. Like most parents, we are eager for our children to develop to their greatest potential. We want them to be well received by the world. For many writers, the mark of their success equals publication.

This desire, while good intentioned, sends most of us to the parenting section of the bookstore where all of the craft books sit. We browse through the promises that each one will provide us with a formula, a set of do’s and don’ts that will guide us through the process of developing our story. But I think if we are too anxious, too eager to receive the mark of publication approval, we endanger ourselves as writers into becoming a ‘stage parent’ of sorts; dressing our stories up and urging them on a path that we believe will lead to success—without taking into account what our stories actually want for their own lives.

I started out as a new mom with no prior experience when it came to writing this novel. After several years of immersing myself in craft to catch up on the basics, I now focus on using craft in a way that supports the story in front of me, rather than forcing my story into the rules of craft. I don’t always do it perfectly, but parenting has never been about perfection.

The process has made me stop and reflect about this mad rush to shove our stories out into the world and what we might lose along the way. Impressed both with my meeting him in person and his first book Writing the Breakout Novel, I decided to look at literary agent Donald Maass’s new book The Fire in Fiction: Passion, Purpose and Techniques to Make Your Novel Great.

One of the aspects that has made Maass a ‘parenting’ author who I trust is that he seems to address this issue of needing both a balance of ‘how-to’ craft while also focusing on encouraging authors to develop an intimate relationship with their stories.

Donald Maass has been gracious in offering to answer a few questions about his new book. Read his answers below.

1. One of the things you discuss in The Fire of Fiction had me declaring ‘yes!’ out loud when I read it. You differentiate between writers who seek a certain prestige and status by being published and those that are focusing on storytelling. Will you elaborate on this?
Almost every fiction writer wants to be published. After a certain number of years spent learning the craft, the hunger for validation can become overwhelming. So much time! So many manuscripts! So many questions from well-meaning family and friends! So close!

It’s at this point that writers can start looking for short cuts. Self-publishing probably is the least effective. Turning to genre fiction is understandable—hey, paranormal is hot, right?—but only teaches one to write genre fiction. Gimmicks and strategies to get the attention of agents and editors grow in appeal but unfortunately don’t work. So what is one to do? There’s only one answer: commit to powerful storytelling, whatever or however long it takes to get there.

2. I have noticed a trend for writers to pride themselves on being business-savvy about their writing. Meaning, there is a tendency for writers to summon a brave front and willingness to do what it takes to get their story published. It has almost become a mark of good ‘parenting’ to formulate a story based on what the author thinks will sell. I have wondered if both of your books were inspired by realizing the need writers have for a way to marry the world of storytelling and crafting for publication. Have you seen in a change in the type of queries and manuscripts you have been receiving over the years?
Well, we get more of them. It’s never been easier to find agents. What hasn’t increased is the proportion of great manuscripts. You mention “savvy” and writing what one thinks will sell. Let me propose something to think about: Are the most successful authors imitators of others? Certainly they may be influenced, or find inspiration in a tradition (noir, say), but those who make it big bring their own individual voice to their fiction. Put more plainly, they write with a passion that is uniquely their own. Even if they write within genre boundaries, highly successful authors create their own genre, as it were. Nobody else writes quite like them.

3. Your books have a permanent place on my shelf (well, Kindle) because of the way you cleverly present lessons in craft that serve the double task of demanding honesty and intimacy in the author/story relationship while also giving a story the best chance of being published. You discuss the use of tension a lot in both of your books. Do you think focusing on the tension in a story is a key to achieving this balance between raising an authentic story and giving it the greatest chance to be well-received by readers?
Tension is the key to everything. There are three kinds: plot tension, scene tension and line-by-line tension–what I call “micro-tension.” Let me elaborate on that last one. Micro-tension is what causes us to have to read every next thing on the page. If you are skimming, micro-tension is absent. If you are staying up too late to read just one more chapter, micro-tension is high.

It doesn’t matter what category we’re talking about. Micro-tension is what makes a novel a page turner. Now, how do you create it? I spend a whole long chapter in The Fire in Fiction detailing the methods, but it boils down to this: Tension in dialogue comes from the tension between people, not what they’re talking about. Tension in action does not come from flying bullets—sorry!—it comes from inside the POV characters. Exposition (interior monologue, stream of consciousness, or whatever you want to call interiority) does not produce tension: it is the tension between conflicting emotions or warring ideas that makes exposition crackle. Once you understand the techniques of micro-tension you can do anything, break any rule.

One more thing: You may think your novel is crackling with tension. I promise you, it’s not. Every manuscript needs more tension. Every manuscript.

Eros-Alegra Clarke is currently writing her first novel.

“Why I Write” Popular Ranking Starts Today!

0
Popular Ranking for the Editor Unleashed/Smashwords Why I Write Essay Contest begins at 12 noon EST today!Ranking will take place from Feb. 1 – Feb. 28 on the Editor Unleashed forum. You must be a registered forum member to participate in essay ranking (registration is free).

Here’s how to vote:

1. We’re using the star ranking system (examples: 1 = terrible, 5 = excellent) to rank stories.
2. To rank a story after you’ve read it, click on “Rate Thread” in the upper-right hand corner. Choose a ranking for that essay (1-5)
3. You may read and vote on as many stories as you want. But please only vote on the stories you’ve read.
4. Only one vote per forum member per story.
5. No lobbying for votes on the forum, although you’re welcome to ask for votes elsewhere.
6. You’re welcome to read and rank as many or as few entries as you like.Good luck to all who entered and thanks for participating!
Thanks to Mark Coker of Smashwords for co-sponsoring this contest!

-Maria Schneider

A Writer’s Resolutions

0

Guest post by Alegra Clarke

Every year my husband and I make two lists on New Year’s Eve. One of the lists is of our resolutions, the other is our requests. We like to look at resolutions as things that we know we can achieve by our own efforts. The requests represent our dreams and hopes for the year ahead. The two lists often find themselves intertwined, the requests representing the fruit we hope to harvest as the result of fulfilling our resolutions. An example would be the resolution to write and submit ten short stories with my request being that four or more of those stories might find publication.

There is something deeply satisfying when a request is fulfilled. At the end of each year we review all of the things we have achieved and the requests that have come to pass. The achievement of a resolution grants us a temporary sense of accomplishment but the fulfillment of a request gives us something more—it fuels our sense of adventure and possibility.

Requests are fulfilled in ways that are always a surprise and very often involve the generosity of others. I like this, especially when it comes to my writing goals. It allows me a certain freedom to dream big and work with full commitment but without so much fear of failure— after all, besides trying to win the affection of my muse by buying her pretty notebooks and taking her out for lattes at artsy cafes, I have to surrender the outcome of my writing efforts and enjoy the adventure. I can’t force someone to publish me, at least not in any way that will help me sleep better at night, so I never know which one of my writing requests will be fulfilled or how it will come to pass.

This year my resolutions are streamlined. This has nothing to do with finally learning moderation or respecting my limits and everything to do with the fact that two of my resolutions are so big that they nearly consume all of the oxygen in my brain whenever I think of them. As the mother of a newborn, two small children and a horse-dog, I really need that oxygen. My first two resolutions are to finish my master’s degree and finish the novel. My other resolutions are intended to support those first mammoth tasks.

Morning Pages & Writing Routines

Years ago my mother gave me the book The Artist’s Way by Julie Cameron and from that book I took away the habit of writing morning pages (three pages of hand written stream of consciousness) and made it a daily practice for several years. My memoir that won the Writer’s Digest Competition, Salamander Prayer, was born out of these pages. I’ve decided to return to writing them this year.

The other resolution is to experiment with my writing routine. Most of my favorite authors have discussed the importance of certain rituals when working on a project. For some it is the need to write in the same place at the same time every day. For others it might be going for a walk every morning. Whatever it is, the key thing is that it requires consistency. I have never attempted this before and I want to try it out for myself. One of my first experiments is to work on the novel only in my bedroom. It is the one space in my small home where I can have some level of control over my environment—especially once my husband gets around to installing a lock on the door.

What are your writing resolutions this year? Or if you don’t believe in resolutions, I’d love to hear some of your working habits or writing rituals. I am always inspired to hear how other writers work and dream.

Alegra Clarke is a frequent contributor to Editor Unleashed.

We’re Back in Action!

0

Well, Happy New Year everyone! Great news: I was able to find a tech genius working over the holidays to fix our broken forum. Check it out—good as new.

Due to the forum downtime, we’re extending the deadline of the Editor Unleashed/ Smashwords “Why I Write” essay contest to January 31. Popular ranking will now take place over the month of February.

Thanks so much for your concern, your support and especially your patience through the crash. You all make this so worthwhile for me. Finding out how much this site is appreciated has really inspired and re-committed me.

Technical Issues

0

just wanted to let everyone know that I’ve run into substantial technical issues with this site and I’ve been having a difficult time diagnosing and fixing the problems.

I upgraded the blog to the new version of WP last week, and it hasn’t worked quite right since.

The EU forum has completely disappeared, and has apparently been hacked.

I’m so sorry about this. I’m working to try and resolve these issues. If anyone can offer help/advice/IT expertise/a box of tissues, please send my way asap.

-Maria Schneider

Dr. Wicked: NaNoWriMo’s Obstetrician

1

By Alegra Clarke

November has come and gone and left me with some valuable lessons. The first lesson is that a heavily pregnant woman (that would be me) should never brag to her husband about how she “feels pretty confident that I will be able to write the first half of the novel this month, maybe even get close to the end.”

That is right, I strutted in front of November 1st rolling my neck, cracking my knuckles, daring NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) to lift its gun in the air and begin the race. I was feeling in fine form. I planned not only to match last year’s stride towards the finish line but maybe cross it before the race was over, circle back to the beginning and start again. And then the gun went off. The earth trembled with the stampeding of thousands of fingers hitting keyboards all over the planet. I felt the adrenaline surge. I took my first stride forward and then…I fell on my face.

I would like to blame the whole ‘big and pregnant’ thing for the way I faltered but let’s face it, writing is a race of the mind, and the only thing that my mind was encumbered by was expectation. I was ripe with it. After months of research, mulling over plot, making attempts at the first several chapters and taking workshops, I had conceived this idea that 50,000 words were just waiting to emerge cleanly out of my mind. I was dreaming of a fully formed baby. In fact, I think I expected the novel to come out walking, talking and toilet-trained without a whole lot of sweat and effort on my part. Of course, I was wrong.

NaNoWriMo Lessons

Last year’s NaNoWriMo left me with a manuscript of harvestable material and the lesson that I am someone who needs to do some advance plotting before I begin writing. This year NaNoWriMo taught me that the first stages of labor are necessarily messy. Rough drafts do not always emerge from euphoric inspiration. In fact, mine required a lot of hard pushing and lots of swearing. I also learned that the best way to stall out is to have grand expectations.

I had about eight chapters outlined and I believed they would come tumbling out onto the page in technicolor, the characters fully realized, the prose singing. They didn’t. I panicked at the first sign that things were not going to go as painlessly as planned. I began pacing and searching for things to eat. I watched back to back episodes of “The Office.” I started to come up with elaborate rationalizations about how it was physically impossible to get the words out. I was stuck and an intervention was necessary. So, I took myself to the ER of writers: Dr. Wicked

Dr.Wicked is labor induction for words that need to get out. You choose the length of time you want to write and how fast and furious you want the pace to be set. I chose both ‘evil’ and ‘kamikaze’ modes—the meanest of the mean that Dr.Wicked has to offer. If the ‘electric shock’ mode was actually functional, I would have been setting myself up to be jolted.

I was ready to get the chapters out of my head. ‘Evil mode’ meant that I was given maybe 3 seconds to pause during writing before ‘kamikaze mode’ kicked in and started erasing everything I had previously written. It forced me to get past my expectations and start writing. One 48 minute with Dr.Wicked gave me about 1300 words. After about 5 sessions, I began to feel something like affection towards those screaming, messy rough drafts. I realized that they were a necessary stage, the beginning of my chapters cleaning up and coming to life as the cooing, rosy-cheeked sweethearts I had been daydreaming about.

Check out Alegra’s pre-NaNoWrimo post: Writing with the Bulls.

Dr. Wicked: NaNoWriMo’s Obstetrician

0

November has come and gone and left me with some valuable lessons. The first lesson is that a heavily pregnant woman (that would be me) should never brag to her husband about how she “feels pretty confident that I will be able to write the first half of the novel this month, maybe even get close to the end.”

Picture-1

That is right, I strutted in front of November 1st rolling my neck, cracking my knuckles, daring NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) to lift its gun in the air and begin the race. I was feeling in fine form. I planned not only to match last year’s stride towards the finish line but maybe cross it before the race was over, circle back to the beginning and start again. And then the gun went off. The earth trembled with the stampeding of thousands of fingers hitting keyboards all over the planet. I felt the adrenaline surge. I took my first stride forward and then…I fell on my face.

I would like to blame the whole ‘big and pregnant’ thing for the way I faltered but let’s face it, writing is a race of the mind, and the only thing that my mind was encumbered by was expectation. I was ripe with it. After months of research, mulling over plot, making attempts at the first several chapters and taking workshops, I had conceived this idea that 50,000 words were just waiting to emerge cleanly out of my mind. I was dreaming of a fully formed baby. In fact, I think I expected the novel to come out walking, talking and toilet-trained without a whole lot of sweat and effort on my part. Of course, I was wrong.

NaNoWriMo Lessons

Last year’s NaNoWriMo left me with a manuscript of harvestable material and the lesson that I am someone who needs to do some advance plotting before I begin writing. This year NaNoWriMo taught me that the first stages of labor are necessarily messy. Rough drafts do not always emerge from euphoric inspiration. In fact, mine required a lot of hard pushing and lots of swearing. I also learned that the best way to stall out is to have grand expectations.

I had about eight chapters outlined and I believed they would come tumbling out onto the page in technicolor, the characters fully realized, the prose singing. They didn’t. I panicked at the first sign that things were not going to go as painlessly as planned. I began pacing and searching for things to eat. I watched back to back episodes of “The Office.” I started to come up with elaborate rationalizations about how it was physically impossible to get the words out. I was stuck and an intervention was necessary. So, I took myself to the ER of writers: Dr. Wicked

appiconwtext

Dr.Wicked is labor induction for words that need to get out. You choose the length of time you want to write and how fast and furious you want the pace to be set. I chose both ‘evil’ and ‘kamikaze’ modes—the meanest of the mean that Dr.Wicked has to offer. If the ‘electric shock’ mode was actually functional, I would have been setting myself up to be jolted.

I was ready to get the chapters out of my head. ‘Evil mode’ meant that I was given maybe 3 seconds to pause during writing before ‘kamikaze mode’ kicked in and started erasing everything I had previously written. It forced me to get past my expectations and start writing. One 48 minute with Dr.Wicked gave me about 1300 words. After about 5 sessions, I began to feel something like affection towards those screaming, messy rough drafts. I realized that they were a necessary stage, the beginning of my chapters cleaning up and coming to life as the cooing, rosy-cheeked sweethearts I had been daydreaming about.

Live Chat: Agent Ginger Clark tonight 8 p.m.

0

We’re hosting a live chat with literary agent Ginger Clark tonight at 8 p.m. EST so come talk books and publishing on the forum tonight. Here’s the thread.

And you can find her interview in the previous post.